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Behavioral Mediators of the Human Population Effect on Global Biodiversity Losses

Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD,volume 214)

Abstract

By combining the time depth provided by the fossil and archeological records with contemporary data of global reach, we can begin to dissect out the most relevant factors that threaten the future of all levels of biodiversity on this planet. It is our contention that the size of the human population and the scale of the human endeavor led to a dramatic rise in extinctions over the past 10,000 years. Analyses of contemporary data demonstrate that current species threats are best attributed to variability in species richness, human population density, and agricultural land use. Continued exponential growth in the human population and our resultant environmental dominance, due to cultural development and ecological contingencies, is rapidly leading to a global mass extinction.

Keywords

  • Species Threat
  • Ecological Footprint
  • Demographic Transition
  • Biodiversity Loss
  • Stepwise Multiple Regression Analysis

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Richard Cincotta for the invitation to write this chapter as well as his insights that helped guide our analysis.

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Correspondence to Jeffrey K. McKee .

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McKee, J.K., Chambers, E.N. (2011). Behavioral Mediators of the Human Population Effect on Global Biodiversity Losses. In: Cincotta, R., Gorenflo, L. (eds) Human Population. Ecological Studies, vol 214. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-16707-2_4

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