“I Want to Slay That Dragon!” - Influencing Choice in Interactive Storytelling

  • Rui Figueiredo
  • Ana Paiva
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6432)

Abstract

In this paper we consider the issues involved in influencing a user in an interactive storytelling context using results from the social psychology’s area of persuasion. We hypothesize that it is possible to use these results in order to influence the user in predictable ways. Several important concepts of persuasion, such as how people make decisions, and how can we influence that process are discussed. We describe a proposal on how to apply these results in an interactive storytelling setting and describe a small study were we have successfully influenced the players of a story in following a specific path by using an expert source manipulation.

Keywords

Interactive Storytelling Persuasion Interactive Narrative 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rui Figueiredo
    • 1
  • Ana Paiva
    • 1
  1. 1.INESC-IDInstituto Superior TécnicoPorto SalvoPortugal

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