A Visualization System for Analyzing Information Leakage

  • Yuki Nakayama
  • Seiji Shibaguchi
  • Kenichi Okada
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 337)

Abstract

Information leakage is a growing public concern. This paper describes a visualization system for tracing leaks involving confidential information. In particular, the system enables administrators to determine which hosts have confidential documents and the means by which confidential information is transmitted, received and duplicated. The visualization system is scalable to large organizations and can track various means of information propagation in a seamless manner. Also, it helps prevent information leaks, analyze transmission routes and present forensic evidence.

Keywords

Information leakage visualization data tracing 

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Copyright information

© International Federation for Information Processing 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuki Nakayama
    • 1
  • Seiji Shibaguchi
    • 2
  • Kenichi Okada
    • 1
  1. 1.Keio UniversityKanagawaJapan
  2. 2.NintendoKyotoJapan

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