Cognitive Invariants of Geographic Event Conceptualization: What Matters and What Refines?

  • Alexander Klippel
  • Rui Li
  • Frank Hardisty
  • Chris Weaver
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6292)

Abstract

Behavioral experiments addressing the conceptualization of geographic events are few and far between. Our research seeks to address this deficiency by developing an experimental framework on the conceptualization of movement patterns. In this paper, we report on a critical experiment that is designed to shed light on the question of cognitively salient invariants in such conceptualization. Invariants have been identified as being critical to human information processing, particularly for the processing of dynamic information. In our experiment, we systematically address cognitive invariants of one class of geographic events: single entity movement patterns. To this end, we designed 72 animated icons that depict the movement patterns of hurricanes around two invariants: size difference and topological equivalence class movement patterns endpoints. While the endpoint hypothesis, put forth by Regier (2007), claims a particular focus of human cognition to ending relations of events, other research suggests that simplicity principles guide categorization and, additionally, that static information is easier to process than dynamic information. Our experiments show a clear picture: Size matters. Nonetheless, we also find categorization behaviors consistent with experiments in both the spatial and temporal domain, namely that topology refines these behaviors and that topological equivalence classes are categorized consistently. These results are critical steppingstones in validating spatial formalism from a cognitive perspective and cognitively grounding work on ontologies.

Keywords

Geographic event conceptualization topology similarity spatial cognition 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Klippel
    • 1
  • Rui Li
    • 1
  • Frank Hardisty
    • 1
  • Chris Weaver
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Geography, GeoVISTA CenterThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.School of Computer Science and Center for Spatial AnalysisThe University of OklahomaUSA

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