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Reflective Visualization of the Agreement Quality in Mediation

  • Yoshiharu Maeno
  • Katsumi Nitta
  • Yukio Ohsawa
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6284)

Abstract

Training for mediators is a complex issue. It is generally effective for trainees to reflect on their past thinking, speaking, and acting. We present a text processing method which aids mediation trainees in reflecting on how they reached an agreement from their dialogue. The method is an improved variant of the Data Crystallization algorithm, which visualizes the inter-topic associations which foreshadow the intentional or unintentional subsequent development of topics far apart in time. We demonstrate how the dialogues which differ in the agreement quality affects the topological characteristics of the associations.

Keywords

Logic Programming Software Agent Alternative Dispute Resolution Cognitive Science Society Auction Site 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshiharu Maeno
    • 1
  • Katsumi Nitta
    • 2
  • Yukio Ohsawa
    • 3
  1. 1.Social Design GroupTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Tokyo Institute of TechnologyYokohama-shi, KanagawaJapan
  3. 3.The University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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