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Validation of Knee Joint Models – An In Vivo Study

  • M. S. Andersen
  • J. Rasmussen
  • D. K. Ramsey
  • D. L. Benoit
Part of the IFMBE Proceedings book series (IFMBE, volume 31)

Abstract

The effect of modeling the knee as a simple spherical or revolute joint during gait, cutting and hopping were evaluated. The results indicate that, even during gait, a revolute joint may be too restrictive in its representation of the knee, with flexion/extension errors as high as 9.4°. By imposing the spherical joint, joint angles showed consistent and strong correlations with the true joint angles for the functional tasks, although internal/external rotation angle were moderately affected (errors up to 4.2°). For both constraint types, the remaining Degrees of Freedom (DOF) were not consistent across subjects and must be considered unreliable, with translation errors of up to 11.0 mm with a spherical joint and 11.9 with a revolute joint.

In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that inclusion of a spherical joint produced reliable results only for joint angles, yet significant bone translations were eliminated from the recovered motion. Furthermore, the constraints imposed flexion/extension errors of up to 4.4° with a spherical joint (observed during hopping) and 9.4° with a revolute joint (observed during gait). Although the joint DOF errors are generally smaller than those associated with soft tissue artefacts, they may still contribute to a significant source of error in the models when used.

Keywords

Kinematics knee models validation in vivo 

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Copyright information

© International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. S. Andersen
    • 1
  • J. Rasmussen
    • 1
  • D. K. Ramsey
    • 2
  • D. L. Benoit
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing EngineeringAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark
  2. 2.Department of Exercise and Nutrition SciencesUniversity of BuffaloBuffaloUSA
  3. 3.School Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health SciencesUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada

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