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Development of a Thermo-Optical Sensor for Measurements of Wall Shear Stress Magnitude and Direction

  • Ilka Rudolph
  • Matthias Reyer
  • Wolfgang Nitsche
Part of the Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics and Multidisciplinary Design book series (NNFM, volume 112)

Summary

In recent years, investigations regarding novel thermo-optical techniques for the visualization and quantification of wall shear stress distributions were conducted, [1], [2], [3]. These techniques correlate the temperature field on a structure to the near wall flow. Based on these findings, a new sensor was developed that is capable of measuring skin friction magnitude and direction as well as visualizing the near wall flow. The new thermo-optical sensor presented in this paper was investigated numerically at first, to find suitable correlation parameters. In contrast to existing investigations, a unique correlation parameter was found that produces better and more reliable results than previously proposed parameters. With the help of the numerical results, a sensor was designed, built and tested in wind tunnel experiments.

Keywords

Wall Shear Stress Skin Friction Wind Tunnel Experiment Adiabatic Wall Wall Shear Stress Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ilka Rudolph
    • 1
  • Matthias Reyer
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Nitsche
    • 1
  1. 1.Technichal University BerlinBerlinGermany

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