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MOST-NNG: An Accessible GPS Navigation Application Integrated into the MObile Slate Talker (MOST) for the Blind

  • Norbert Márkus
  • András Arató
  • Zoltán Juhász
  • Gábor Bognár
  • László Késmárki
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6180)

Abstract

Over the recent years, GPS navigation has been attracting a growing attention among the visually impaired. This is because assistive technologies can obviously be based on commercially available solutions, as the GPS capable hand-held devices entered the size range of the ordinary mobile phones, and are available at an ever more affordable price, now providing a real choice for a wider audience. For many, an accessible GPS navigator has even become an indispensable tool, an integral part of their every-day life. Since the most appropriate (or at least the most favored) device type for GPS navigation is the so-called PDA, whose user interface is dominated by a touch screen and usually lacks any keyboard, accessibility for the blind remains an issue. This issue has successfully been tackled by the MOST-NNG project in which, the MObile Slate Talker’s blind-friendly user interface has been combined with Hungary’s leading iGO navigator.

Keywords

Test User Touch Screen Screen Reader Blind User Menu Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norbert Márkus
    • 1
  • András Arató
    • 1
  • Zoltán Juhász
    • 2
  • Gábor Bognár
    • 1
  • László Késmárki
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of Speech Technology for RehabilitationKFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear PhysicsBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Department of Electrical Engineering and Information SystemsUniversity of PannoniaVeszprémHungary
  3. 3.Nav ’N Go Hungary LTDBudapestHungary

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