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Augmented and Alternative Communication System Based on Dasher Application and an Accelerometer

  • Isabel Gómez
  • Pablo Anaya
  • Rafael Cabrera
  • Alberto Molina
  • Octavio Rivera
  • Manuel Merino
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6180)

Abstract

This paper describes a system composed by predictive text input software called “Dasher” and a hardware used to connect an accelerometer to the computer. The main goal of this work is to allow people with motor disabilities to have a flexible and cheap way to communicate. The accelerometer can be placed on any body part depending on user preferences. For this reason calibration functionality has been added to dasher software. The calibration process is easy and requires only some minutes but it is necessary in order to allow system can be used in different ways. Tests have been carried out by placing the accelerometer on the head. A rate of 26 words per minute is reached.

Keywords

dasher accelerometer open and flexible system text input 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isabel Gómez
    • 1
  • Pablo Anaya
    • 1
  • Rafael Cabrera
    • 1
  • Alberto Molina
    • 1
  • Octavio Rivera
    • 1
  • Manuel Merino
    • 1
  1. 1.Electronic Technology DepartmentUniversidad de SevillaSpain

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