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Friendly Human-Machine Interaction in an Adapted Robotized Kitchen

  • Joan Aranda
  • Manuel Vinagre
  • Enric X. Martín
  • Miquel Casamitjana
  • Alicia Casals
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6179)

Abstract

The concept and design of a friendly human-machine interaction system for an adapted robotized kitchen is presented. The kitchen is conceived in a modular way in order to be adaptable to a great diversity in level and type of assistance needs. An interaction manager has been developed which assist the user to control the system actions dynamically according to the given orders and the present state of the environment. Real time enhanced perception of the scenario is achieved by means of a 3D computer vision system. The main goal of the present project is to provide this kitchen with the necessary intelligent behavior to be able to actuate efficiently by interpreting the users’ will.

Keywords

Intelligent Behavior Model Data Base Modular Element Interaction System Framework Logical Filter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joan Aranda
    • 1
  • Manuel Vinagre
    • 1
  • Enric X. Martín
    • 2
  • Miquel Casamitjana
    • 2
  • Alicia Casals
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), UPCSpain
  2. 2.Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, UPC-BarcelonaTECHSpain

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