Advertisement

Rapid Listening of DAISY Digital Talking Books by Speech-Rate Conversion Technology for People with Visual Impairments

  • Naoyuki Tazawa
  • Shinichi Totihara
  • Yukio Iwahana
  • Atsushi Imai
  • Nobumasa Seiyama
  • Toru Takagi
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6179)

Abstract

We have performed studies and evaluation experiments of more acceptable rapid speech, aimed at implementation in applications such as installation in commercial devices designed for visually impaired persons. Although our method’s playback time is same as the conventional High-speed playback technology, listener might feel playing in slower speeds and listen words clearer. Our proposal technology makes it possible to adaptive speech rate control in utterance position and pitch/power in the speech information, instead of changing the speed of the utterance uniformly. We performed an experiment in Japanese and American subject with visual impairments respectively to compare the conventional high-speed playback technology and that of our adaptive high-speed playback technology in terms of "Listenability". The reaction to our proposal method from subjects with visual impairments has been very positive underscoring its potential as an effective tool for listening to high-speed speech.

Keywords

DAISY digital talking books Visual impairment Rapid listening Assistive Technology 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Watanabe, T.: A Study on Voice Settings of Screen Readers for Visually-Impaired PC Users. IEICE Transactions on Information and Systems, D-I J88-D-I (8), 1257–1260 (2005) (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Torihara, S.: An Oblique Listening Method for the Blind and Visually impaired. In: The Sixteenth Annual Conference on Technology and Persons with Disabilities, CSUN 2001. California State University, Northridge (March 2001)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Torihara, S., Nakamura, M., Ueda, N., Wada, T., Ishizaki, S.: English “Oblique” Listening System – Rapid Listening System for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and Its Evaluation. In: Miesenberger, K., Klaus, J., Zagler, W.L., Karshmer, A.I. (eds.) ICCHP 2006. LNCS, vol. 4061, pp. 53–60. Springer, Heidelberg (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Nishimoto, T., et al.: Evaluation of text-to-speech synthesizers at fast speaking rates. Technical Report of IEICE, WIT2005-5, pp. 23–28 (May 2005) (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Imai, A., et al.: An Adaptive Speech-Rate Conversion Method for News Programs without Accumulating Time Delay. IEICE Transactions A J83-A(8), 935–945 (2000) (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Asakawa, C., et al.: The optimal and maximum listening rates in presenting speech information to the blind. Journal of Human Interface Society 7(1), 105–111 (2005) (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Imai, A., Takagi, T., Takeishi, H.: Development of Radio and Television Receivers with Functions to Assist Hearing of Elderly People. In: Broadcast Technology No.35, Combined Issue Autumn 2008 - Winter 2009 (NHK Science and Technology Research Laboratories) (2009)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naoyuki Tazawa
    • 1
  • Shinichi Totihara
    • 3
  • Yukio Iwahana
    • 1
  • Atsushi Imai
    • 1
  • Nobumasa Seiyama
    • 1
  • Toru Takagi
    • 2
  1. 1.NHK Engineering Services, INC.TokyoJapan
  2. 2.NHK(Japan Broadcasting Corp.) Science & Technology Research LaboratoriesTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Keio Research Institute at SFC 5322 EndoFujisawaJapan

Personalised recommendations