Advertisement

Creating Virtual Stiffness by Modifying Force Profile of Base Object

  • Atsutoshi Ikeda
  • Yuichi Kurita
  • Takeshi Tamaki
  • Kazuyuki Nagata
  • Tsukasa Ogasawara
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6191)

Abstract

This paper presents a haptic augmented reality (AR) system that consists of a real object and a haptic device. The desired force response is achieved by the combination of the real force response of a base object and the virtual force exerted by a haptic device. The proposed haptic AR system can easily generate the force response of an object with a cheap haptic device and a base object. In the haptic AR method, how we select the base object is very important because virtual stiffness provided to users is created by modifying the reaction force profile of the base object. We compare the three method: VR method , AR method with a soft object and AR method with a hard object in the questionnaire experiment. These results show that the AR method with a soft object has better performance than the other methods.

Keywords

haptic interface augmented reality 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
  2. 2.
    (Mentice mist), http://www.mentice.com/
  3. 3.
    Wu, W., Heng, P.A.: An improved scheme of an interactive finite element model for 3d soft-tissue cutting and deformation. The Visual Computer 21(8-10), 707–716 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ghoi, C., Kim, J., Han, H., Ahn, B., Kim, J.: Graphic and haptic modeling of the oesophagus for vr-based medical simulation. International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery 5(3), 257–266 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Lim, Y.J., Deo, D., Singh, T.P., Jones, D.B., De, S.: In situ measurement and modeling of biomechanical response of human cadaveric soft tissues for physics-based surgical simulation. International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery 23(6), 1298–1307 (2009)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Nagata, K., Tada, M., Iwasaki, H., Kida, Y.: Development of haptic recorder 1st report: Development of basic system. In: Proc. of the SICE System Integration Symposium, pp. 484–485 (2006) (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Nagata, K., Tada, M., Iwasaki, H., Kida, Y.: Development of haptic recorder 2nd report: Constructing a virtual object model based on actual measurment. In: Proc. of the SICE System Integration Symposium, pp. 11–12 (2007) (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Jeon, S., Choi, S.: Modulating real object stiffness for haptic augmented reality. In: Ferre, M. (ed.) EuroHaptics 2008. LNCS, vol. 5024, pp. 609–618. Springer, Heidelberg (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kurita, Y., Ikeda, A., Tamaki, T., Nagata, K., Ogasawara, T.: Haptic augmented reality interface using the real force response of an object. In: The 16th ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology, pp. 83–86 (2009)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hayashi, D., Ohnishi, H., Nakamura, N.: Understand the effect of visual information and delay on a haptic display. IEICE technical report. Education technology 106(437), 7–10 (2006)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Atsutoshi Ikeda
    • 1
  • Yuichi Kurita
    • 1
  • Takeshi Tamaki
    • 1
  • Kazuyuki Nagata
    • 2
  • Tsukasa Ogasawara
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Information ScienceNara Institute of Science and TechnologyJapan
  2. 2.Intelligent Systems Research InstituteNational Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and TechnologyJapan

Personalised recommendations