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Size-Adapted Manipulation Robots for Microassembly

  • J. Ellwood
  • A. Burisch
  • K. Schöttler
  • G. Pokar
  • A. Raatz
  • J. Hesselbach
Chapter
Part of the Microtechnology and MEMS book series (MEMS)

Abstract

In order to assembly the microactuators which have been presented, unique microassembly techniques, robots, and peripheral sensors are needed. It has also been observed that an imbalance between the everdecreasing product sizes to the size of currently implemented manipulators exists. These things as well as the large initial investment costs of such manipulators, have been the inspiration for new microassembly technologies. Here special emphasis is placed on two examples, one showing a size-adapted robot and the other extending this concept to a miniaturized design. Different considerations to obtain a repeatability on the order of 1 µm or better are presented. In the presentation of the size-adapted design, a special emphasis is placed on the integration of a three-dimensional vision sensor and resulting sensor-guided assembly control concept. The second robot discussed is a highly miniaturized robot designed for desktop factories. Here the high level of performance is obtained using miniaturized, backlash-free microgears. Further insight into the highly accurate microgears and their dynamic effects on the robot are covered.

Keywords

Force Sensor Vision Sensor Transmission Error Parallel Robot Assembly Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Ellwood
    • 1
  • A. Burisch
    • 1
  • K. Schöttler
    • 1
  • G. Pokar
    • 1
  • A. Raatz
    • 1
  • J. Hesselbach
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Machine Tools and Production TechnologyTechnische Universität BraunschweigBraunschweigGermany

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