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Kontrolle und Koordination multipler Handlungen

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Hommel, B., Nattkemper, D. (2011). Kontrolle und Koordination multipler Handlungen. In: Handlungspsychologie. Springer-Lehrbuch. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-12858-5_8

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