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Study on Integrated Model of Lean and Agile Supply Chain Based on Multi-DPs

  • Jiang Mei Xian
  • Feng Ding Zhong
  • Fan Jia Jing
  • Yan Lian Lian
  • Jin Shou Song
Part of the Advances in Intelligent and Soft Computing book series (AINSC, volume 71)

Abstract

Lean Production and Agile Manufacturing are currently two popular methods of production. These two popular methods are based on different levels of supply chain optimization and there is an integrated space between these two popular methods. In this paper, we analyse the lean and agile production coupling point or Decoupling Point (DP) in two types of supply chain integration model based on some parts’ or components’ production process, under the constraints of time, cost and other factors in the supply chain operation and production process. Finally we carry on critical path analysis on the selection of the lean and agile production coupling point or Decoupling Point (DP), and then achieve the optimal integrated strategy.

Keywords

Lean Production Agile manufacturing multi-DPs Lean-Agile supply chain 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jiang Mei Xian
    • 1
  • Feng Ding Zhong
    • 1
  • Fan Jia Jing
    • 1
  • Yan Lian Lian
    • 1
  • Jin Shou Song
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Industrial Engineering and Logistical EngineeringZhejiang University of Technology, The MOE Key Laboratory of Mechanical Manufacture and AutomationHangzhouChina

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