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Legal Aspects: How Do Food Supplements Differ from Drugs, Medical Devices, and Cosmetic Products?

Abstract

About 2500 years ago, Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, shaped the relationship between the use of appropriate foods for health and their therapeutic potential and quoted “…let food be the medicine….”

Keywords

  • Member State
  • Medical Device
  • Medicinal Product
  • Product Category
  • Food Supplement

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

*The opinions herein are mine (Catherine Fish) and do not necessarily reflect those of Bayer Consumer Care AG or its affiliates.

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Abbreviations

AESGP:

Association of the European Self-medication Industry

BGH:

Bundesgerichtshof (German Federal Higher Court)

CECP:

Committee of Expert on Cosmetic Products

CHMP:

Committee on Human Medicinal Products

EAS:

European Advisory Services

EC:

European Commission

EFSA:

European Food Safety Authority

EMEA:

European Medicines Evaluation Agency

ERNA:

European Responsible Nutrition Alliance

EU:

European Union

GCP:

Good Clinical Practice

GMOS:

Genetically Modified Organism

ILSI:

International Life Sciences Institute

INCI:

International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients

MEDDEV:

Medical Device

MRP:

Mutual Recognition Procedure

OTC:

Over The Counter

QUID:

Quantitative Ingredient Declaration

SCC-NFP:

Scientific Committee on Cosmetic Products & Non Food Products

SCCP:

Scientific Committee on Cosmetic Products

UV:

UltraViolet

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Correspondence to Helena Karajiannis .

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Karajiannis, H., Fish, C. (2010). Legal Aspects: How Do Food Supplements Differ from Drugs, Medical Devices, and Cosmetic Products?. In: Krutmann, J., Humbert, P. (eds) Nutrition for Healthy Skin. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-12264-4_15

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-12264-4_15

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