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The Last-Mile Evacuation Project: A Multi-disciplinary Approach to Evacuation Planning and Risk Reduction in Tsunami-Threatened Coastal Areas

Part of the Advanced Technologies in Earth Sciences book series (ATES)

Abstract

In view of recent tragic and disastrous tsunami events such as the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 or the Tohoku-Oki tsunami in 2011 it is still indispensable to aim at deepening our insight into the mechanisms which turn natural disasters into life-changing events for those individuals living at regions at risk. In this context risk mitigation on the basis of well-implemented early warning systems is inevitable to reduce human losses and to pave the way for specific measures on disaster recovery. A possible work chain to assess this complex objective is exemplified by the interdisciplinary “Last-Mile Evacuation project” which focused on the city of Padang, Indonesia. This city is one of the cities worldwide most imperiled by tsunamis since it is located in the direct neighborhood to the Sunda arc with an average warning time below 30 min. The work chain presented in the present paper comprises the generation and compilation of the underlying geo data basis, the simulation of hydrodynamics, the assessment of physical vulnerability using remote sensing data and techniques, the assessment of social vulnerability related with people’s exposure, risk perception, and evacuation behavior, and the modeling of potential evacuation routes. While the main focus of the original project was on city-wide risk assessment, the focal point of this study is a close-up view of the micro-scale dynamics of inundation and evacuation on urban district level. The existing situation and urban setting is subsequently compared with alternative shelter options. Additionally, qualitative information on social aspects to be considered in developing appropriate mitigation options is outlined. It is anticipated to communicate best-practice knowledge on how to approach the assessment of tsunami hazard with potential overlapping areas to other natural disasters.

Keywords

  • Social Vulnerability
  • Disaster Risk Reduction
  • Evacuation Time
  • Tsunami Hazard
  • Evacuation Route

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    For further explanation on the analysis methods and findings see Setiadi and Birkmann (2010); Setiadi et al. (2010); Setiadi (2011a); Taubenböck et al. (2012).

  2. 2.

    Please note that especially the qualitative data represent the situation in the city up to the data collection period. Slight changes in the city may have taken place, especially after the major earthquake event in September 2009 and the latest progress in disaster management of the city.

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Acknowledgments

The authors would to thank the DFG/BMBF special Programme “Geotechnologies”—Early Warning Systems in Earth Management. Sponsorship Code: 03G0643A-E. We would also like to thank our partners in Padang Indonesia from Andalas University and the city municipality of Padang.

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Correspondence to N. Goseberg .

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Goseberg, N., Lämmel, G., Taubenböck, H., Setiadi, N., Birkmann, J., Schlurmann, T. (2014). The Last-Mile Evacuation Project: A Multi-disciplinary Approach to Evacuation Planning and Risk Reduction in Tsunami-Threatened Coastal Areas. In: Wenzel, F., Zschau, J. (eds) Early Warning for Geological Disasters. Advanced Technologies in Earth Sciences. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-12233-0_11

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