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Emissions

  • Michael Palocz-Andresen
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

Transportation produces exhaust gas emissions. The products are gases, particles, noise, and heat. However, pollutants can be emitted not only by engines but also by other devices such as fire extinguishers, fuel tanks, and refrigerators on vehicles, airplanes, and ships. In fact, most emissions are produced by the burning process in internal combustion engines.

Keywords

Test Bench Internal Combustion Engine Real Emission Fire Extinguisher Engine Test Bench 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Palocz-Andresen
    • 1
  1. 1.UCS UmweltconsultingHamburgGermany

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