Intelligent Mobile Health Monitoring System (IMHMS)

  • Rifat Shahriyar
  • Md. Faizul Bari
  • Gourab Kundu
  • Sheikh Iqbal Ahamed
  • Md. Mostofa Akbar
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 27)

Abstract

Health monitoring is repeatedly mentioned as one of the main application areas for Pervasive computing. Mobile Health Care is the integration of mobile computing and health monitoring. It is the application of mobile computing technologies for improving communication among patients, physicians, and other health care workers. As mobile devices have become an inseparable part of our life it can integrate health care more seamlessly to our everyday life. It enables the delivery of accurate medical information anytime anywhere by means of mobile devices. Recent technological advances in sensors, low-power integrated circuits, and wireless communications have enabled the design of low-cost, miniature, lightweight and intelligent bio-sensor nodes. These nodes, capable of sensing, processing, and communicating one or more vital signs, can be seamlessly integrated into wireless personal or body area networks for mobile health monitoring. In this paper we present Intelligent Mobile Health Monitoring System (IMHMS), which can provide medical feedback to the patients through mobile devices based on the biomedical and environmental data collected by deployed sensors.

Keywords

Mobile Health care Health Monitoring System Intelligent Medical Server 

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Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Science, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rifat Shahriyar
    • 1
  • Md. Faizul Bari
    • 1
  • Gourab Kundu
    • 1
  • Sheikh Iqbal Ahamed
    • 1
  • Md. Mostofa Akbar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringBangladesh University of Engineering and TechnologyBangladesh

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