The Costs of Non-training in Chronic Wounds: Estimates through Practice Simulation

  • Pedro Gaspar
  • Josep Monguet
  • Jordi Ojeda
  • João Costa
  • Rogério Costa
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 27)

Abstract

The high prevalence and incidence rates of chronic wounds represent high financial costs for patients, families, health services, and for society in general. Therefore, the proper training of health professionals engaged in the diagnosis and treatment of these wounds can have a very positive impact on the reduction of costs.

As technology advances rapidly, the knowledge acquired at school soon becomes outdated, and only through lifelong learning can skills be constantly updated. Information and Communication Technologies play a decisive role in this field. We have prepared a cost estimate model of Non-Training, using a Simulator (Web Based System – e-fer) for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic wounds.

The preliminary results show that the costs involved in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic wounds are markedly higher in health professionals with less specialized training.

Keywords

Non-training pratice simulation costs estimation 

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Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Science, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pedro Gaspar
    • 1
  • Josep Monguet
    • 2
  • Jordi Ojeda
    • 2
  • João Costa
    • 1
  • Rogério Costa
    • 1
  1. 1.Polytechnic Institute of LeiriaPortugal
  2. 2.Universitat Politècnica de CatalunyaSpain

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