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The PET Magnifier Probe

  • Carlos LacastaEmail author
  • Neal H. Clinthorne
  • Gabriela Llosá
Chapter
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Abstract

Positron emission tomographic (PET) devices are routinely used for diagnosis. They provide medical doctors with a useful tool to locate and discover tumors with a spatial resolution that is in the order of 5–8 mm FWHM (full width at half maximum). This resolution is just enough for a search scan, but not enough to detect small lesions, making it challenging to detect uptake in tumors smaller than about 1 ml in volume, which translates to a 12.5-mm diameter of a spherical lesion. This is particularly true in the case of prostate and bladder cancers. Conventional PET scanning, with its large ring geometry, has not been effective for the detection of very small intraprostatic lesions, small pelvic lymph node metastases, invasion into nearby tissues, or in the case of bladder cancer, the extent of bladder wall invasion.

Keywords

Positron Emission Tomographic Silicon Sensor Intrinsic Spatial Resolution Readout Chip Probe Prototype 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlos Lacasta
    • 1
    Email author
  • Neal H. Clinthorne
    • 2
  • Gabriela Llosá
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto de Física Corpuscular – IFIC/CSIC-UGEVValenciaSpain
  2. 2.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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