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Effects of Soil Management from Fallow to Grassland on Soil Microbial and Organic Carbon Dynamics

  • Yuping Wu
  • Sarah Kemmitt
  • Jianming Xu
  • Philip C Brookes
Conference paper

Abstract

Permanent 60 year fallow, arable and grassland soils from the Highfield Ley-Arable Experiment at Rothamsted Research, UK were used to investigate if extremes in soil management affected soil microbial biomass, microbial activity and microbial diversity. They were incubated under laboratory conditions, with and without amendment with a labile (yeast extract) and recalcitrant substrate (ryegrass). Microbial biomass ATP concentrations were not significantly different between the soils, with or without substrate addition. The biomasses in the three soils also mineralised the two substrates similarly and microbial biosynthesis efficiency (measured as biomass C and ATP) was similar. However, Phospholipid Fatty Acid (PLFA) analysis revealed that microbial community structure, with and without substrates, differed significantly between soils. Therefore substrate type drives soil microbial ecosystem response much more than does soil microbial biodiversity.

Keywords

Biomass Community structure Mineralization Phospholipid fatty acid 

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References

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Copyright information

© Zhejiang University Press, Hangzhou and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuping Wu
    • 1
  • Sarah Kemmitt
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jianming Xu
    • 1
  • Philip C Brookes
    • 2
  1. 1.Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, College of Environmental Natural Resource SciencesZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina
  2. 2.Soil Science DepartmentRothamsted ResearchHarpenden, HertsUK
  3. 3.LondonUK

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