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Establishing a Comprehensive Pediatric Integrative Oncology Program

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Part of the Pediatric Oncology book series (PEDIATRICO)

Abstract

The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by adult and pediatric oncology patients is highly prevalent around the world. Surveys in Europe, Japan, Singapore, and the United States have demonstrated substantial use, with 40–91 % of adult cancer patients choosing CAM as part of their treatment (Molassiotis et al. 2006; Hyodo et al. 2005; Shih et al. 2008; Yates et al. 2005). Pediatric CAM use is also high, as confirmed by a recent systematic review of 28 studies of pediatric cancer patients from 14 countries (Yates et al. 2005). The prevalence of pediatric CAM use ranged from 6 to 91 %, with the most popular therapies being herbal remedies, nutritional interventions, and faith healing (Bishop et al. 2010). This increased use of CAM has been associated with a concurrent rise in adult and pediatric academic integrative medicine centers, where CAM research and education complement clinical initiatives with a common mission to provide high-quality, evidence-based care.

Keywords

  • Integrative Medicine
  • Pediatric Cancer Patient
  • Natural Health Product
  • Pediatric Oncology Patient
  • Integrative Therapy

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Sunita Vohra M.D., FRCPC, M.Sc. .

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Punja, S., Langevin, M., Sencer, S., Vohra, S. (2012). Establishing a Comprehensive Pediatric Integrative Oncology Program. In: Längler, A., Mansky, P., Seifert, G. (eds) Integrative Pediatric Oncology. Pediatric Oncology. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-04201-0_14

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-04201-0_14

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