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Innovation and Application of Environment-Friendly Antiviral Agents for Plants

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Abstract

In the research work described in the first four chapters, several compounds, such as Dufulin and GU188, were identified with high bioactivities against plant virus such as TMV or CMV. Afterwards, a great deal of work in this area was carried out, which included the preparation of Dufulin formulation (SC, EC, and WP), optimization of synthetic conditions, and studies on health toxicity evaluation, field trial bioassay, residue analysis, environmental behavior, systemic behaviors, as well as mode of action. Based on these work, Dufulin and its formulation were granted temporary registrations by the Ministry of Agriculture of China and were put into industrial production for large scale field application. Besides, some basic mechanicstic research on the mode of action of Dufulin was conducted which proved that Dufulin exerts its function through a new mechanism by activating the plant immune system. Extensive R&D work on cyanoacrylate derivative GU188 was also undertaken which included the synthesis optimization, bioassays, field trial, toxicity evaluation, and mode of aciton investigation. It was demonstrated that GU188 is another highly active potential antiviral agents for plants. The bioassay and mechanism of another antiviral product for plants, named “Jingtuling”(0.5% amino-oligosaccharin aqua), which was produced from the marine biowastes, were also studied.

Keywords

  • Pond Water
  • Suspension Concentrate
  • Emulsion Concentrate
  • Wettable Powder
  • Salicylic Acid Content

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2010 Chemical Industry Press, Beijing and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Song, B., Jin, L., Yang, S., Bhadury, P.S. (2010). Innovation and Application of Environment-Friendly Antiviral Agents for Plants. In: Environment-Friendly Antiviral Agents for Plants. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-03692-7_6

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