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IITKGP-SESC: Speech Database for Emotion Analysis

  • Shashidhar G. Koolagudi
  • Sudhamay Maity
  • Vuppala Anil Kumar
  • Saswat Chakrabarti
  • K. Sreenivasa Rao
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 40)

Abstract

In this paper, we are introducing the speech database for analyzing the emotions present in speech signals. The proposed database is recorded in Telugu language using the professional artists from All India Radio (AIR), Vijayawada, India. The speech corpus is collected by simulating eight different emotions using the neutral (emotion free) statements. The database is named as Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur Simulated Emotion Speech Corpus (IITKGP-SESC). The proposed database will be useful for characterizing the emotions present in speech. Further, the emotion specific knowledge present in speech at different levels can be acquired by developing the emotion specific models using the features from vocal tract system, excitation source and prosody. This paper describes the design, acquisition, post processing and evaluation of the proposed speech database (IITKGP-SESC). The quality of the emotions present in the database is evaluated using subjective listening tests. Finally, statistical models are developed using prosodic features, and the discrimination of the emotions is carried out by performing the classification of emotions using the developed statistical models.

Keywords

IITKGP-SESC Duration Emotion Emotion recognition Energy Prosody Statistical models Pitch 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shashidhar G. Koolagudi
    • 1
  • Sudhamay Maity
    • 1
  • Vuppala Anil Kumar
    • 2
  • Saswat Chakrabarti
    • 2
  • K. Sreenivasa Rao
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Information TechnologyIndia
  2. 2.G.S. Sanyal School of TelecommunicationsIndian Institute of Technology KharagpurKharagpurIndia

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