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Multilevel Models of Commute Times for Men and Women

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Progress in Spatial Analysis

Part of the book series: Advances in Spatial Science ((ADVSPATIAL))

Abstract

The commuting time discrepancy between men and women is known as the commuting time gender gap. Empirical evidence for the gender gap seems to be conclusive. However, recent research on commuting times in San Francisco (Gossen and Purvis 2005) and Philadelphia (Weinberger 2007) suggests that the gender gap is less ubiquitous than previously thought. To test whether or not the attenuation of the gender gap is idiosyncratic to single-city analyses of commuting times, national data is used to specify three statistical models of private-vehicle commuting times for men-only, women-only, and pooled men–women subsamples from the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). The first goal of this chapter is to ascertain what personal characteristics of men and women and what locational characteristics of cities have the greatest affect on private-vehicle commuting times. The second goal of this chapter is to ascertain how much of the variation in commuting times for men and women originates within cities and how much originates between cities.

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Correspondence to Edmund J. Zolnik .

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Zolnik, E.J. (2010). Multilevel Models of Commute Times for Men and Women. In: Páez, A., Gallo, J., Buliung, R., Dall'erba, S. (eds) Progress in Spatial Analysis. Advances in Spatial Science. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-03326-1_10

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