Capturing and Building Expertise in Virtual Worlds

  • Jared Freeman
  • Webb Stacy
  • Jean MacMillan
  • Georgiy Levchuk
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5638)

Abstract

Model-driven simulation can make the design and delivery of instruction more efficient and effective. We describe two computational models that support both the design and delivery of instruction. BEST (the Benchmarked Experiential System for Training) can guide experts through the space of domain problems during the knowledge engineering phase of instructional design; it can guide trainees through the space of training objectives during instruction. PRESTO (Pedagogically Relevant Engineering of Scenarios for Training Objectives) builds scenarios on the fly to elicit the knowledge of experts during instructional design, and to satisfy the instructional objectives of trainees.

Keywords

Adaptive instruction knowledge engineering Constraint Logic Programming Markov Decision Process 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jared Freeman
    • 1
  • Webb Stacy
    • 1
  • Jean MacMillan
    • 1
  • Georgiy Levchuk
    • 1
  1. 1.Aptima, Inc.WashingtonUSA

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