HADRIAN: Fitting Trials by Digital Human Modelling

  • Keith Case
  • Russell Marshall
  • Dan Hogberg
  • Steve Summerskill
  • Diane Gyi
  • Ruth Sims
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5620)

Abstract

Anthropometric data are often described in terms of percentiles and too often digital human models are synthesised from such data using a single percentile value for all body dimensions. The poor correlation between body dimensions means that products may be evaluated against models of humans that do not exist. Alternative digital approaches try to minimise this difficulty using pre-defined families of manikins to represent human diversity, whereas in the real world carefully selected real people take part in ‘fitting trials’. HADRIAN is a digital human modeling system which uses discrete data sets for individuals rather than statistical populations. A task description language is used to execute the evaluative capabilities of the underlying SAMMIE human modelling system as though a ‘real’ fitting trial was being conducted. The approach is described with a focus on the elderly and disabled and their potential exclusion from public transport systems.

Keywords

Digital Human Modelling User Trials SAMMIE HADRIAN 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Case
    • 1
    • 4
  • Russell Marshall
    • 2
  • Dan Hogberg
    • 4
  • Steve Summerskill
    • 2
  • Diane Gyi
    • 3
  • Ruth Sims
    • 2
  1. 1.Mechanical and Manufacturing EngineeringUK
  2. 2.Department of Design and TechnologyUK
  3. 3.Department of Human SciencesLoughborough UniversityUK
  4. 4.The School of Technology and SocietyUniversity of SkövdeSweden

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