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Hair Growth Parameters in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women

Abstract

Women who undergo menopause have a cessation of ovarian estrogen production. This dramatic hormonal alteration is known to have significant effects on the skin and cutaneous appendages. As our understanding of the molecular and hormonal controls on the folliculo-sebaceous unit has grown, there has been renewed interest in the role of estrogens in modulating hair growth. Specifically, the relatively recent discovery of estrogen receptor beta has broadened and redefined prior concepts of estrogen activity and signaling. In a cohort of pre- and postmenopausal women without alopecia, a modified phototrichogram was used to measure hair density, growth rate, and percentage anagen. Optical fiber diameter analysis (OFDA) was used to determine hair diameters. Our aim was to determine whether there are any changes in hair characteristics and hair growth parameters that correlate with menopausal status. Postmenopausal women had significant changes, mainly in the frontal scalp as compared to premenopausal women. These changes included lower frontal scalp percent anagen hairs, growth rates, and hair diameters. Further study of hair changes in response to menopause provides an important opportunity for identification of treatments, targets, and strategies that may significantly benefit women.

Keywords

  • Postmenopausal Woman
  • Hair Follicle
  • Menopausal Status
  • Hair Growth
  • Hair Density

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-02636-2_6
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Correspondence to Paradi Mirmirani .

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Mirmirani, P. et al. (2010). Hair Growth Parameters in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women. In: Trüeb, R., Tobin, D. (eds) Aging Hair. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02636-2_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02636-2_6

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