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Empowering Students and the Community through Agile Software Development Service-Learning

  • Joseph T. Chao
  • Jennifer K. Brown
Part of the Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing book series (LNBIP, volume 31)

Abstract

This paper describes an approach to service-learning in the software engineering classroom that involves a central clearinghouse and maintenance center for service-learning project requests, use of Agile methods, and collaboration with a technical communication course. The paper describes the benefits and drawbacks to service-learning in a software engineering course, rationale behind using Agile, the course layout, specifics of the collaboration, the final feedback of the community partners and students involved, and a discussion of lessons learned.

Keywords

Teaching Agile Methods Agile Software Development Software Engineering Education Pedagogy Service-learning Active Learning Real-world Project 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph T. Chao
    • 1
  • Jennifer K. Brown
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceIndia
  2. 2.Department of EnglishBowling Green State UniversityBowling GreenUSA

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