Advertisement

Intentions in BDI Agents: From Theory to Implementation

  • S. Bonura
  • V. Morreale
  • G. Francaviglia
  • A. Marguglio
  • G. Cammarata
  • M. Puccio
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent and Soft Computing book series (AINSC, volume 55)

Abstract

In the context of the Belief Desire Intention (BDI) agent model and Bratman’s theory, intentions play a primary role in reasoning towards actions. Indeed, intentions are supposed to be stable, constrain further deliberation, be conduct-controlling and influence beliefs about the future.

Thus, in this paper we present how PRACTIONIST, which is an integrated suite to develop BDI agent systems, embodies such properties of intentions. This allows to develop agents with the ability to know if desires are impossible, incompatible with other intentions and if intentions are achieved or no longer of interest.

We first give an overview of the PRACTIONIST deliberation process. Then the implementation of such properties is shown throughout a running example, i.e. the PSTS (PRACTIONIST Stock Trading System), which is aimed to monitor investors stock portfolio by managing risk and profit and supporting decisions for on-line stock trading, on the basis of investors trading rules and their risk attitude.

Keywords

Multiagent System Active Goal Trading Rule Commitment Strategy Stock Trading 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Bellifemine, F., Poggi, A., Rimassa, G.: JADE - a FIPA-compliant agent framework. In: Proceedings of the Practical Applications of Intelligent Agents (1999)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bratman, M.E.: Intention, Plans, and Practical Reason. Harvard University Press, Cambridge (1987)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Braubach, L., Pokahr, A., Lamersdorf, W., Moldt, D.: Goal representation for BDI agent systems. In: Second International Workshop on Programming Multiagent Systems: Languages and Tools, pp. 9–20 (July 2004)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Busetta, P., Rönnquist, R., Hodgson, A., Lucas, A.: JACK intelligent agents - components for intelligent agents in java. Agentlink News (January 1999)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Georgeff, M.P., Pell, B., Pollack, M.E., Tambe, M., Wooldridge, M.: The belief-desire-intention model of agency. In: Rao, A.S., Singh, M.P., Müller, J.P. (eds.) ATAL 1998. LNCS, vol. 1555, pp. 1–10. Springer, Heidelberg (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hindriks, K.V., De Boer, F.S., van der Wiebe, H., Jc Meyer, J.: Agent programming in 3APL. In: Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems, vol. 2(4), pp. 357–401. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Netherlands (1999)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Huber, M.J.: Jam: a bdi-theoretic mobile agent architecture. In: AGENTS 1999: Proceedings of the third annual conference on Autonomous Agents, pp. 236–243. ACM Press, New York (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Marguglio, A., Cammarata, G., Bonura, S., Francaviglia, G., Puccio, M., Morreale, V.: Design and development of intentional systems with PRACTIONIST Studio. In: Proceedings of Joint Workshop From Objects to Agents, Palermo, Italy (2008)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Morreale, V., Bonura, S., Francaviglia, G., Centineo, F., Cossentino, M., Gaglio, S.: Goal-oriented development of BDI agents: the PRACTIONIST approach. In: Proceedings of Intelligent Agent Technology, Hong Kong, China. IEEE Computer Society Press, Los Alamitos (2006)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Morreale, V., Bonura, S., Francaviglia, G., Centineo, F., Puccio, M., Cossentino, M.: Developing intentional systems with the practionist framework. In: Proceedings of the 5th IEEE International Conference on Industrial Informatics (INDIN 2007) (July 2007)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Rao, A.S.: AgentSpeak(L): BDI agents speak out in a logical computable language. In: van Hoe, R. (ed.) Seventh European Workshop on Modelling Autonomous Agents in a Multi-Agent World, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (1996)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Rao, A.S., Georgeff, M.P.: Modeling rational agents within a BDI-architecture. In: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Principles of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning, pp. 473–484. Morgan Kaufmann publishers Inc., San Francisco (1991)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Weiss, G. (ed.): Multiagent Systems: A Modern Approach to Distributed Artificial Intelligence. MIT Press, Cambridge (1999)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Winikoff, M., Padgham, L., Harland, J., Thangarajah, J.: Declarative & procedural goals in intelligent agent systems. In: Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Principles of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning, Toulouse, France, pp. 470–481 (2002)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Bonura
    • 1
  • V. Morreale
    • 1
  • G. Francaviglia
    • 1
  • A. Marguglio
    • 1
  • G. Cammarata
    • 1
  • M. Puccio
    • 1
  1. 1.Intelligent Systems unit - R&D Laboratory - Engineering Ingegneria Informatica S.p.A. 

Personalised recommendations