Musicians Outperform Nonmusicians in Speech Imitation

  • Barbara Pastuszek-Lipińska
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4969)

Abstract

Recently can be observed a growing interest in the effects of music on humans. Music has been called a food or a multi-sensory fitness of the brain. Many studies have already confirmed that practice and active involvement in music improve spatio-temporal functions, verbal memory, visuo-spatial abilities, reading, self-esteem, and generally cognitive processes. In the present paper, a general overview of research on the influence of music on humans has been provided. Moreover, it has been presented data on a research project, which was conducted with the aim to examine whether music education may be viewed as one of the factors, that improve second language acquisition.

Keywords

musicianship musical abilities foreign language acquisition speech perception auditory functions cognition 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Pastuszek-Lipińska
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EnglishAdam Mickiewicz UniversityPoznańPoland

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