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Cervical Spine Traumas

  • Luca DenaroEmail author
  • Umile Giuseppe Longo
  • Alberto Di Martino
  • Vincenzo Denaro

The cervical spine is involved in more than half of all the patients with traumatic spine injuries. To discuss about the most frequent complications occurring in the management of patients with cervical spine injury, it is necessary to briefl y introduce some aspects of the methodological approach, therapeutic options, surgical indications and techniques. The main goals of management of patients with cervical spine injuries are decompression, alignment, stabilization, and, if necessary, reconstruction, to prevent further neurological damage and to promote neurological and functional recovery. An adequate management of cervical spine fractures starts from a proper classification of the injury type and assessment of stability of the affected segment [1].

Cervical spine fractures can be classified as “stable” or “unstable”. Moreover, lesions can be distinguished on the basis of spinal cord compromise. Lesions with spinal cord involvement are severe and unstable and require surgical management. On the other hand, lesions without spinal cord involvement can evolve toward a stable or unstable lesion [2].

Keywords

Cervical Spine Vertebral Artery Lateral Mass Cervical Spine Injury Posterior Arch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luca Denaro
    • 1
    Email author
  • Umile Giuseppe Longo
    • 2
  • Alberto Di Martino
    • 2
  • Vincenzo Denaro
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeuroscienceUniversity of PaduaPaduaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma SurgeryCampus Bio-Medico UniversityRomeItaly

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