Glaciers of the Ragged Range, Nahanni National Park Reserve, Northwest Territories, Canada

  • Michael N. Demuth
  • Philip Wilson
  • Dana Haggarty
Chapter
Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

A new glacier inventory was developed for the Ragged Range, an area only recently added to Nahanni National Park Reserve, Northwest Territories. Federal mapping from aerial photography in 1982 was compared with Landsat satellite imagery from 2008. Glacier cover decreased in area by 30 % over that period; the greatest percentage loss was in glaciers with areas between 1 and 10 km2, while the largest number of disappearances was of glaciers 0.1–1 km2 in area. The smallest glaciers less than 0.1 km2 in area showed little loss to modest growth in topographic niches protected from solar radiation. Recommendations for further work in this environmentally significant frontier region are provided.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael N. Demuth
    • 1
  • Philip Wilson
    • 2
  • Dana Haggarty
    • 2
  1. 1.Natural Resources Canada—Geological Survey of, Canada—Cryosphere Geoscience SectionOttawaCanada
  2. 2.Parks Canada—Nahanni National Park & ReserveFort Simpson, Northwest TerritoriesCanada

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