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Occupational Dermatoses

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Key Features

  • Skin disease caused or aggravated by an individual's employment.

  • Typically affecting the hands.

  • Most often contact dermatitis.

Keywords

  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Contact Dermatitis
  • Allergic Contact Dermatitis
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Irritant Contact Dermatitis

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Wilkinson, S.M., Coenraads, PJ. (2010). Occupational Dermatoses. In: Krieg, T., Bickers, D.R., Miyachi, Y. (eds) Therapy of Skin Diseases. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-78814-0_61

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-78814-0_61

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