Object-based classification of IKONOS data for vegetation mapping in Central Japan

  • N. Kamagata
  • K. Hara
  • M. Mori
  • Y. Akamatsu
  • Y. Li
  • Y. Hoshino

Abstract

Vegetation mapping using IKONOS data was implemented at a countryside study area in central Japan, where small patches of various plant communities are mixed together in a complicated mosaic pattern. Pixel-based and object-based classifications using only spectral features were implemented and their accuracies were compared. In addition, the object-based classification was also performed on a combination of spectral and textural features, with a stepwise regression model used in the discriminate analysis to select the most relevant features. Classifications were implemented at four levels, the highest of which used seven vegetation categories. The object-based classification proved more accurate than the pixel-based classification. In addition, the addition of textural features generated significant improvements in accuracy. The overall classification accuracy and Kappa coefficients at the highest level were 52.8% and 0.373 for the pixel-based classification; 58.9% and 0.458 for the object-based with spectral features only; and 65.0% and 0.542 for the object-based with additional features. Some problems with misclassification remained, but the overall results demonstrate that object-based classification of very high resolution satellite images using additional features is a practical tool for vegetation mapping in Japan.

Keywords

Vegetation mapping Object-based classification Texture IKONOS Feature selection 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Kamagata
    • 1
  • K. Hara
    • 1
  • M. Mori
    • 2
  • Y. Akamatsu
    • 2
  • Y. Li
    • 3
  • Y. Hoshino
    • 4
  1. 1.Graduate School of InformaticsTokyo University of Information SciencesJapan
  2. 2.Kokusai Kogyo Co. LtdJapan
  3. 3.Japan Space Imaging CorporationJapan
  4. 4.Faculty of AgricultureTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyJapan

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