Abstract

Tiger is a cryptographic hash function with a 192-bit hash value. It was proposed by Anderson and Biham in 1996. Recently, weaknesses have been shown in round-reduced variants of the Tiger hash function. First, at FSE 2006, Kelsey and Lucks presented a collision attack on Tiger reduced to 16 and 17 (out of 24) rounds with a complexity of about 244 and a pseudo-near-collision for Tiger reduced to 20 rounds. Later, Mendel et al. extended this attack to a collision attack on Tiger reduced to 19 rounds with a complexity of about 262. Furthermore, they show a pseudo-near-collision for Tiger reduced to 22 rounds with a complexity of about 244. No attack is known for the full Tiger hash function.

In this article, we show a pseudo-near-collision for the full Tiger hash function with a complexity of about 247 hash computations and a pseudo-collision (free-start-collision) for Tiger reduced to 23 rounds with the same complexity.

Keywords

Cryptanalysis hash functions differential attack collision near-collision pseudo-collision pseudo-near-collision 

References

  1. 1.
    Anderson, R.J., Biham, E.: TIGER: A Fast New Hash Function. In: Gollmann, D. (ed.) Fast Software Encryption. LNCS, vol. 1039, pp. 89–97. Springer, Heidelberg (1996)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kelsey, J., Lucks, S.: Collisions and Near-Collisions for Reduced-Round Tiger. In: Robshaw, M. (ed.) FSE 2006. LNCS, vol. 4047, pp. 111–125. Springer, Heidelberg (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Mendel, F., Preneel, B., Rijmen, V., Yoshida, H., Watanabe, D.: Update on Tiger. In: Barua, R., Lange, T. (eds.) INDOCRYPT 2006. LNCS, vol. 4329, pp. 63–79. Springer, Heidelberg (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Pramstaller, N., Rechberger, C., Rijmen, V.: Exploiting Coding Theory for Collision Attacks on SHA-1. In: Smart, N.P. (ed.) Cryptography and Coding. LNCS, vol. 3796, pp. 78–95. Springer, Heidelberg (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Florian Mendel
    • 1
  • Vincent Rijmen
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Applied Information Processing and Communications (IAIK), Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 16a, A-8010 GrazAustria

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