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Dynamic Policy Analysis

  • Jaap H. Abbring
  • James J. Heckman
Part of the Advanced Studies in Theoretical and Applied Econometrics book series (ASTA, volume 46)

Abstract

This chapter studies the microeconometric treatment-effect and structural approaches to dynamic policy evaluation. First, we discuss a reduced-form approach based on a sequential randomization or dynamic matching assumption that is popular in biostatistics. We then discuss two complementary approaches for treatments that are single stopping times and that allow for non-trivial dynamic selection on unobservables.The first builds on continuous-time duration and event-history models.The second extends the discrete-time dynamic discrete-choice literature.

Keywords

Potential Outcome Exclusion Restriction Duration Model Duration Dependence Unemployment Spell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaap H. Abbring
    • 1
  • James J. Heckman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsVU University AmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsUniversity of ChicagoChicago IL 60637USA

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