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Etomidate and Other Non-Barbiturates

  • C. Vanlersberghe
  • F. Camu
Part of the Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 182)

Abstract

It is today generally accepted that anesthetics act by binding directly to sensitive target proteins. For certain intravenous anesthetics, such as propofol, barbiturates, and etomidate, the major target for anesthetic effect has been identified as the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor, with particular subunits playing a crucial role. Etomidate, an intravenous imidazole general anesthetic, is thought to produce anesthesia by modulating or activating ionotropic Cl--permeable GABAA receptors. For the less potent steroid anesthetic agents the picture is less clear, although a relatively small number of targets have been identified as being the most likely candidates. In this review, we summarize the most relevant clinical and experimental pharmacological properties of these intravenous anesthetics, the molecular targets mediating other endpoints of the anesthetic state in vivo, and the work that led to the identification of the GABAA receptor as the key target for etomidate and aminosteroids.

Keywords

Mean Arterial Pressure Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion GABAA Receptor Effect Compartment Hypnotic Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Vanlersberghe
    • 1
  • F. Camu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyUniversity of Brussels V.U.B. Medical CenterBrusselsBelgium

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