Strategies and Economies for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Agriculture

  • Julian Dumanski
  • Raymond L. Desjardins
  • Rattan Lal
  • Pedro Luiz De Freitas
  • Pierre Gerber
  • Henning Steinfeld
  • Louis Verchot
  • Gerald E. Schuman
  • Justin D. Derner
  • Mark Rosegrant
Chapter

Abstract

Agriculture can make significant contributions to climate change mitigation by (a) increasing soil organic carbon (SOC) sinks, (b) reducing GHG emissions, and (c) off-setting fossil fuel by promoting biofuels. The latter has the potential to counter-balance fossil fuel emissions to some degree, but the overall impact is still uncertain compared to emissions of non-CO2 GHGs, which are likely to increase as production systems intensify. Agricultural lands also remove CH4 from the atmosphere by oxidation, though less than forestlands (Tate et al. 2006; Verchot et al. 2000), but this effect is small compared to other GHG fluxes (Smith 2004).

Keywords

Soil Organic Carbon Climate Change Mitigation Carbon Price Soil Carbon Sequestration Zero Tillage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Dumanski J (2008) Commentary: The changing face of soil and water conservation. Keynote Presentation from the XVII Meeting of the Brazilian Society for Management and Conservation of Soil and Water, Rio de Janeiro, AugustGoogle Scholar
  2. Grant B, Smith W, Desjardins RL, Lemke R, Li C (2004) Estimated N2O and CO2 emissions as influenced by agricultural practices in Canada. Clim Change 65:315–332CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. IPCC (2000) Land-use, land-use change and forestry. Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 375pp. http://www.ipcc.ch/ipccreports/sres/land_use/index.htm
  4. IPCC (2007) Climate change: the physical science base. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. http://www.ipcc.ch/ipccreports/ar4-wg1.htm
  5. Smith KA, Conen F (2004) Impacts of land management on fluxes of trace greenhouse gases. Soil Use Manag 20:255–263CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Tate KR, Ross DJ, Scott NA, Rodda NJ, Townsend JA, Arnold GC (2006) Postharvest patterns of carbon dioxide production, methane uptake and nitrous oxide production in a Pinus radiata D. Don plantation. For Ecol Manag 228:40–50CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. USEPA (2006) Global mitigation of non-CO2 greenhouse gases. US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Washington. http://www.iiasa.ac.at/Research/ECS/IEW2006/docs/2006PPT_Fawcett.pdf
  8. Verchot LV (2007) Opportunities for climate change mitigation in agriculture. A report to the UNFCCC Secretariat. Financial and Technical Support Programme. unfccc.int/files/cooperation_and_support/financial_mechanism/application/pdf/verchot.pdfGoogle Scholar
  9. Verchot LV, Davidson EA, Cattânio JH, Ackerman IL (2000) Land-use change and biogeochemical controls of methane fluxes in soils of eastern Amazonia. Ecosystem 3:41–56CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Vergé XPC, Dyer JA, Desjardins RL, Worth D (2008) Greenhouse gas emissions from the Canadian beef industry. Agric Syst 98:126–134CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Vergé XPC, Dyer JA, Desjardins RL, Worth D (2009a) Greenhouse gas emissions from the Canadian pork industry. Livest Sci 121:92–101CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Vergé XPC, Dyer JA, Desjardins RL, Worth D (2009b) Long-term trends in greenhouse gas emissions from the Canadian poultry industry. J Appl Poultry Res, 18:210–222CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julian Dumanski
    • 1
  • Raymond L. Desjardins
    • 2
  • Rattan Lal
    • 3
  • Pedro Luiz De Freitas
    • 4
  • Pierre Gerber
    • 5
  • Henning Steinfeld
    • 5
  • Louis Verchot
    • 6
  • Gerald E. Schuman
    • 7
  • Justin D. Derner
    • 8
  • Mark Rosegrant
    • 9
  1. 1.Retired from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and World BankOttawaCanada
  2. 2.Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaOttawaCanada
  3. 3.Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  4. 4.Embrapa SoilsRio de JaneiroBrazil
  5. 5.FAO, AGALRomeItaly
  6. 6.Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)BogorIndonesia
  7. 7.Retired from USDA-Agricultural Research ServiceCheyenneIndonesia
  8. 8.USDA-Agricultural Research ServiceCheyenneUSA
  9. 9.International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)WashingtonUSA

Personalised recommendations