Changeable Face Representations Suitable for Human Recognition

  • Hyunggu Lee
  • Chulhan Lee
  • Jeung-Yoon Choi
  • Jongsun Kim
  • Jaihie Kim
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4642)

Abstract

In order to resolve non-revocability of biometrics, changeable biometrics has been recently introduced. Changeable biometrics transforms an original biometric template into a changeable template in a non-invertible manner. The transformed changeable template does not reveal the original biometric template, so that secure concealment of biometric data is possible using a changeable transformation. Changeable biometrics has been applied to face recognition, and there are several changeable face recognition methods. However, previous changeable face transformations cannot provide face images that can be recognized by humans. Hence, ‘human inspection’, a particular property of face biometrics, cannot be provided by previous changeable face biometric methods.

In this paper, we propose a face image synthesis method which allows human inspection of changeable face templates. The proposed face synthesis method is based on subspace modeling of face space, and the face space is obtained by projection method such as principle component analysis (PCA) or independent component analysis (ICA). The face space is modeled by fuzzy C-means clustering and partition-based PCA. Using the proposed method, human-recognizable faces can be synthesized while providing inter-class discrimination and intra-class similarity.

Keywords

changeable face biometrics non-invertibility human inspection face image synthesis partition-based PCA 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyunggu Lee
    • 1
  • Chulhan Lee
    • 1
  • Jeung-Yoon Choi
    • 1
  • Jongsun Kim
    • 1
  • Jaihie Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Biometrics Engineering Research Center (BERC)Republic of Korea

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