Augmented Cognition, Universal Access and Social Intelligence in the Information Society

  • Ray Adams
  • Satinder Gill
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4565)

Abstract

The two concepts of universal access and augmented cognition have both contributed significantly to providing the intended users of modern information and communication technology with the necessary resources to achieve enhanced interaction and performance. The two concepts share a number of important features including; the improvement of user performance, the use of concepts from cognitive psychology, a consideration of user modelling, a user sensitive approach, support for customisation, personalisation, adaptation and adaptive systems. They differentially emphasise; short term and long term demands, ambient intelligence, ubiquitous computing, people with disabilities, the Information Society and social skills. Since the present research programme (CIRCUA) is focussed upon the design and evaluation of universally accessible systems within a vocational context, the concepts of universal access and augmented are both very relevant, though both need to draw more upon the concept of social intelligence if they to tackle key issues of the Information Society.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ray Adams
    • 1
  • Satinder Gill
    • 1
  1. 1.CIRCUA, Collaborative International Research Centre for Universal Access, School of Computing Science, Middlesex University, Ravensfield House, The Burroughs, Hendon, London NW4 4BTUnited Kingdom

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