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CoConceptMap: A System for Collaborative Concept Mapping

  • Mingjun Zhou
  • Xiang Ao
  • Lishuang Xu
  • Feng Tian
  • Guozhong Dai
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4551)

Abstract

Concept mapping is a technique for visualizing the relationships between different concepts, and collaborative concept mapping is used to model knowledge and transfer expert knowledge. Because of lacking some features, existing systems can’t support collaborative concept mapping effectively. In this paper, we analysis the collaborative concept mapping process according to the theory of distributed cognition, and argue the functions effective systems ought to include. A collaborative concept mapping system should have the following features: visualization of concept map, flexible collaboration style, supporting natural interaction, knowledge management and history management. Furthermore, we describe every feature in details. Finally, a prototype system has been built to fully explore the above technologies.

Keywords

collaborative concept mapping distributed cognition pen-based user interface 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mingjun Zhou
    • 1
  • Xiang Ao
    • 1
  • Lishuang Xu
    • 1
  • Feng Tian
    • 1
  • Guozhong Dai
    • 1
  1. 1.Intelligence Engineering Lab, Institute of Software, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100080 BeijingP.R. China

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