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Stylus Enhancement to Enrich Interaction with Computers

  • Yu Suzuki
  • Kazuo Misue
  • Jiro Tanaka
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4551)

Abstract

We introduce a technique to enrich user interaction with a computer through a stylus. This technique allows a stylus to be manipulated in the air to operate applications in new ways. To translate the stylus manipulation into application behavior, we take an approach that we attach an accelerometer to the stylus. Such a stylus allows control through new operations like rolling and shaking, as well as through conventional operations like tapping or making strokes. An application can use these operations to switch modes or change parameters. We have implemented a number of applications, called the “Oh! Stylus Series,” that can be used with our proposed technique.

Keywords

Stylus Enhancement Interaction Accelerometer Behavior 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yu Suzuki
    • 1
  • Kazuo Misue
    • 1
  • Jiro Tanaka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573Japan

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