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Combining Web, Mobile Phones and Public Displays in Large-Scale: Manhattan Story Mashup

  • Ville H. Tuulos
  • Jürgen Scheible
  • Heli Nyholm
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4480)

Abstract

We present a large-scale pervasive game called Manhattan Story Mashup that combines the Web, camera phones, and a large public display. The game introduces a new form of interactive storytelling which lets an unlimited number of players author stories in the Web while a large number of players illustrate the stories with camera phones. This paper presents the first deployment of the game and a detailed analysis of its quantitative and qualitative results. We present details on the game implementation and game set up including practical lessons learnt about this large-scale experiment involving over 300 players in total. The analysis shows how the game succeeds in fostering players’ creativity by exploiting ambiguity and how the players were engaged in a fast-paced competition which resulted in 115 stories and 3142 photos in 1.5 hours.

Keywords

Mobile Phone Game Design Public Display Game Server Game Event 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ville H. Tuulos
    • 1
  • Jürgen Scheible
    • 2
  • Heli Nyholm
    • 3
  1. 1.Helsinki Institute for Information Technology 
  2. 2.University of Art and Design Helsinki 
  3. 3.Nokia Research Center 

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