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Children’s Interactions with Inspectable and Negotiated Learner Models

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Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS 2008)

Part of the book series: Lecture Notes in Computer Science ((LNPSE,volume 5091))

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Abstract

The Learner Model of an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) may be made visible (opened) to its users. An Open Learner Model (OLM) may also become a learning resource in its own right, independently of an ITS. OLMs offer potential for learner reflection and support to metacognitive skills such as self-assessment, in addition to improving learner model accuracy. This paper describes an evaluation of an inspectable and a negotiated OLM (one that can be jointly maintained through student-system discussion) in terms of facilitating self-assessment accuracy and modification of model contents. Both inspectable and negotiated models offered significant support to users in increasing the accuracy of self-assessments, and reducing the number and magnitude of discrepancies between system and user beliefs about the user’s knowledge. Negotiation of the model demonstrated further significant improvements.

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Beverley P. Woolf Esma Aïmeur Roger Nkambou Susanne Lajoie

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© 2008 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Kerly, A., Bull, S. (2008). Children’s Interactions with Inspectable and Negotiated Learner Models. In: Woolf, B.P., Aïmeur, E., Nkambou, R., Lajoie, S. (eds) Intelligent Tutoring Systems. ITS 2008. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 5091. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-69132-7_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-69132-7_18

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-540-69130-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-540-69132-7

  • eBook Packages: Computer ScienceComputer Science (R0)

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