Process Flexibility: A Survey of Contemporary Approaches

  • Helen Schonenberg
  • Ronny Mans
  • Nick Russell
  • Nataliya Mulyar
  • Wil van der Aalst
Part of the Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing book series (LNBIP, volume 10)

Abstract

Business processes provide a means of coordinating interactions between workers and organisations in a structured way. However the dynamic nature of the modern business environment means these processes are subject to a increasingly wide range of variations and must demonstrate flexible approaches to dealing with these variations if they are to remain viable. The challenge is to provide flexibility and offer process support at the same time. Many approaches have been proposed in literature and some of these approaches have been implemented in flexible workflow management systems. However, a comprehensive overview of the various approaches has been missing. In this paper, we take a deeper look into the various ways in which flexibility can be achieved and we propose an extensive taxonomy of flexibility. This taxonomy is subsequently used to evaluate a selection of systems and to discuss how the various forms of flexibility fit together.

Keywords

Taxonomy flexible PAIS design change deviation underspecification 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen Schonenberg
    • 1
  • Ronny Mans
    • 1
  • Nick Russell
    • 1
  • Nataliya Mulyar
    • 1
  • Wil van der Aalst
    • 1
  1. 1.Eindhoven University of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands

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