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The Silicone Industry and its Environmental Impact

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Part of the The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry book series (HEC3,volume 3 / 3H)

Abstract

This chapter presents an overview of silicone technology and the global silicone industry, including the unique properties of silicones, diverse applications, major producers, and their market share. Industry stewardship initiatives and environmental stewardship activities are also discussed. In addition, the missions and membership of the three regional (U.S., Europe, and Japan) health, environmental, and safety organizations are summarized. Although these groups deal with the health, environmental, regulatory, and operational safety aspects of organosilicon materials, the focus in this chapter (and the volume as a whole) has been exclusively on the environmental sciences. The chapter concludes with an environmental impact assessment of three environmentally mobile materials: volatile methylsiloxanes, polydimethylsiloxanes, and polyethermethylsiloxanes.

Keywords

  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Environ Toxicol
  • Silicone Material
  • Methyl Chloride
  • Photochemical Ozone Creation Potential

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Abbreviations

BOD:

biological oxygen demand

CEFIC:

Conseil Europeen de L’Industrie Chemique

CES:

Centre Europeen des Silicones

CFC:

chiorofluorocarbon

CMA:

Chemical Manufacturers’ Association

ECETOC:

European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals

GC/MS:

gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

GNP:

gross national product

GSC:

Global Silicones Council

HES:

Health, Environmental, and Safety

ICCA:

International Council of Chemical Associations

JCIA:

Japan Chemical Industry Association

ODC:

ozone-depleting chemical

PDMS:

polydimethylsiloxane

PEMS:

polyethermethylsiloxane

PPB:

parts per billion

PPM:

parts per million

PPT:

parts per trillion

PSA:

pressure-sensitive adhesive

RTV:

room temperature vulcanizing

SEHSC:

Silicones Environmental, Health and Safety Council

SHC:

Silicones Health Council

SIAJ:

Silicone Industry Association of Japan

VMS:

volatile methylsiloxanes

VOC:

volatile organic compound

WWTP:

wastewater treatment plant

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Chandra, G., Maxim, L.D., Sawano, T. (1997). The Silicone Industry and its Environmental Impact. In: Chandra, G. (eds) Organosilicon Materials. The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry, vol 3 / 3H. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-68331-5_12

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-68331-5_12

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