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Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) -- A Versatile Thin Film Technique

  • Hans-Ulrich KrebsEmail author
  • Martin Weisheit
  • Jörg Faupel
  • Erik Süske
  • Thorsten Scharf
  • Christian Fuhse
  • Michael Störmer
  • Kai Sturm
  • Michael Seibt
  • Harald Kijewski
  • Dorit Nelke
  • Elena Panchenko
  • Michael Buback
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Solid State Physics book series (ASSP, volume 43)

Abstract

Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is for many reasons a versatile technique. Since with this method the energy source is located outside the chamber, the use of ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) as well as ambient gas is possible. Combined with a stoichiometry transfer between target and substrate this allows depositing all kinds of different materials, e.g., high-temperature superconductors, oxides, nitrides, carbides, semiconductors, metals and even polymers or fullerenes can be grown with high deposition rates. The pulsed nature of the PLD process even allows preparing complex polymer-metal compounds and multilayers. In UHV, implantation and intermixing effects originating in the deposition of energetic particles lead to the formation of metastable phases, for instance nanocrystalline highly supersaturated solid solutions and amorphous alloys. The preparation in inert gas atmosphere makes it even possible to tune the film properties (stress, texture, reflectivity, magnetic properties ...) by varying the kinetic energy of the deposited particles. All this makes PLD an alternative deposition technique for the growth of high-quality thin films.

Keywords

Pulse Laser Deposition Energetic Particle Plasma Plume High Deposition Rate Interface Roughness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans-Ulrich Krebs
    • 1
    Email author
  • Martin Weisheit
    • 1
  • Jörg Faupel
    • 1
  • Erik Süske
    • 1
  • Thorsten Scharf
    • 1
  • Christian Fuhse
    • 1
  • Michael Störmer
    • 1
  • Kai Sturm
    • 1
  • Michael Seibt
    • 2
  • Harald Kijewski
    • 3
  • Dorit Nelke
    • 4
  • Elena Panchenko
    • 4
  • Michael Buback
    • 4
  1. 1.Institut für MaterialphysikUniversität GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  2. 2.IV. Physikalisches InstitutUniversität GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  3. 3.Institut für RechtsmedizinUniversität GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  4. 4.Institut für Physikalische ChemieUniversität GöttingenGöttingenGermany

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