A Cinematography System for Virtual Storytelling

  • Nicolas Courty
  • Fabrice Lamarche
  • Stéphane Donikian
  • Éric Marchand
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2897)

Abstract

In this paper we introduce a complete framework to automatically generate ”cinematographic view” of dynamic scenes in real-time. The main goal of such a system is to provide a succession of shots and sequences (of virtual dynamic scenes) that can be related to pure cinema. Our system is based on the use of an image-based control of the camera that allows different levels of visual tasks and a multi-agent system that controls those cameras and selects the type of shot that has to be performed in order to fulfill the constraints of a given cinematographic rule (idiom). This level of adaptation constitutes the major novelty of our system. Moreover, it stands for a convenient tool to describe cinematographic idioms for real-time narrative virtual environments.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicolas Courty
    • 1
  • Fabrice Lamarche
    • 2
  • Stéphane Donikian
    • 3
  • Éric Marchand
    • 1
  1. 1.Irisa RennesINRIARennes CedexFrance
  2. 2.Irisa RennesUniversity of Rennes IRennes CedexFrance
  3. 3.Irisa RennesCNRSRennes CedexFrance

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